Skip navigation

Tag Archives: 2009

Ladies and gentlemen, Them Crooked Vultures — the second-best band John Paul Jones has ever been in! The Led Zeppelin guys never made much of a splash in the supergroup scene, unless you’re the kind of die-hard fan who still busts out those old records by the Honeydrippers or the Firm. But when John Paul Jones got the hard-rock supersession itch, he didn’t mess around. For Them Crooked Vultures, he hooks up with Dave Grohl (Foo Fighters) and Josh Homme (Queens of the Stone Age), two of Zep’s smartest disciples. If these three 800-pound gorillas want to bash out an album as willfully weird and slapdash as Them Crooked Vultures, who can tell them not to? And if they do a song called “Elephants” where they basically crunch every riff onLed Zeppelin II into seven dizzy minutes, why not?

On Them Crooked Vultures, the three rock stars don’t exactly visit the depths of Mordor. The album sticks to the sort of low-end guitar boogie that Homme and Grohl were blasting in their Camaros when they bummed their first cigarettes. The first thing you hear is Grohl’s instantly recognizable drums whomping out “Nobody Loves Me & Neither Do I,” as Homme plays desert-rat guitar and Jones adds a bass line as nasty as “Out on the Tiles.” Homme takes almost all the lead vocals, but he doesn’t try to define or dominate the songs, mostly doing lyric goofs like “Slick back my hair/You know the devil’s in there.”

Sometimes the music sounds exactly like Zeppelin, as on “Reptiles,” a sly update of “South Bound Suarez.” Other times it sounds like Queens of the Stone Age with a hot new bassist. But it’s not desperately ambitious — the album sounds like the good-natured quickie it probably was. Jones plays a few keyboard solos in “Mind Eraser, No Chaser” and “Scumbag Blues,” and though Homme doesn’t sing like Robert Plant (his upper register sounds more like Cream’s Jack Bruce), he does deliver loads of Jimmy Page doppelgänger solos, just to prove he can.

Despite the fact that Jones has spent most of the past three decades doing ornate orchestral arrangements (most smashingly on R.E.M.’s Automatic for the People), he doesn’t get fancy here. He puts all his mojo into forward motion, reminding you he’s the bass man who helped give the world “Black Dog.” But the stylistic asides here add a bit of flavor. The superbly titled “Interlude With Ludes” is a psychedelic ditty with a circus-style loop, as Homme muses, “On the good ship Lollygag/LSD and a bloody pile of rags/I hate to be the bearer of bad news/But I am.” “Warsaw or the First Breath You Take After You Give Up” is a daffy eight-minute Doors tribute. And “Caligulove” is, well, a song called “Caligulove.”

Homme and Grohl are old hands at this kind of thing — see their excellent Zeppelin homages on the Queens’Songs for the Deaf. But they definitely seem inspired by Jonesy’s presence, and he helps them keep it light. Homme and Grohl pound away like fanboys touched with the spirit, as if jamming with one of their heroes brought out their wanton side. That’s what makesThem Crooked Vultures fun: It’s fan fiction with a classic-rock heart.

 

source : http://www.rollingstone.com

Advertisements

There aren’t many times where you get to talk to a real genuine person who cares not only his work but the people who he works with and is involved with on a daily basis. Ron “Bumblefoot” Thal is definitely one of those people. I met Ron back in July when he was touring withLita and at that time we talked bout doing an interview. Not only did Ron stick to his word, he couldn’t be more accommodating to do it. We talked about how he got involved with Axland GN’R to his involvement with raising awareness for Multiple Sclerosis. Didn’t Axl sing “We got your disease?” Well, we have your disease right here live in the flesh, an interview with “Bumblefoot!”

Gus: One of the big CD’s that came out late last year was ‘Chinese Democracy.’ It was a huge buzz surrounding the release of the CD. Why did it take the band so long to tour in support of the record?

Ron: There were other possible or potential tours or itineraries in the works that just didn’t happen for whatever reason. This one did though. Why? (laughs) I don’t try to know anything. My philosophy as time goes on is swinging more towards ‘ignorance is bliss.’ The less I know the happier I am. I don’t want to know a damn thing except tell me when to get on stage and play.

Gus: Guns N’ Roses are scheduled to perform in Japan in December. I’m sure your looking forward to it. What can the fans expect when you guys do perform live?

Ron: I can’t give anything away as we are trying to keep it a surprise until we do it. We will be playing a lot of old stuff, newer stuff, a lot of bombs n’ pyro (laughs.) I’m dodging the question – you know, the stuff you see at a big rock show.

Gus: You just wrapped up doing rehearsals and you have a new guitar partner in DJ Ashba. How did your rehearsals go with DJ?

Ron: It went great! He is a damn good guy to be in a band with. He gives a lot of himself and adds a lot of himself to every aspect of it. He gets involved artistically. He’s a damn good guy. I’ve enjoyed getting to know him and playing with him. And working through the insanity of getting the stuff down with him. Now, I’m just really looking forward to getting on stage with him.

Gus: So he is fitting in quite well and fitting in nicely with everybody?

Ron: He’s good to go!

Gus: That’s good to hear. How did you originally get involved with one of the biggest marquee name bands in the world?

Ron: It was about 5 years ago. I got an email from Joe Satriani to tell me he recommended me for the gig (Guns N’ Roses) so if someone did reach out that I knew it wasn’t a joke or something. Very soon after, one of the guys from the band emailed me and we started talking. I started talking to guys working on the album about recording and then spoke to management. Eventually we hit the road and started touring and in between legs of the tour started recording tracks for the album, putting my 2 cents into it. That was it, and here we are.

Gus: Looking back since the release of Chinese Democracy, are you happy with the finished product or would there be something you would change?

Ron: On my behalf, I’m as happy as I possibly can be. Which goes like, I’m happy for a week, and then I start hearing all the things I would like to change. That’s the way I am with all my own albums too. Anything I’m involved with I’m like that. The honeymoon period lasts for about a week, then the little things start to haunt ya (laughs.) It’s always like that but I’ve gotten better at rolling with it and now it doesn’t drive me as crazy. You’ve got to treat it like a moment and that moment was captured, and then move on to the next moment.

Read entire interview here.

Source: BACKSTAGEAXXESS.com

A topic debated for decades now. Personally, I’d give the edge to Pearl Jam. They just keep producing albums and never seem to sell out. Nirvana, on the other hand, is overrated. Granted they pretty much helped kick open the doors publicly to grunge, their music isn’t as good as PJ’s. The overall consensus leans towards Nirvana however. I guess another poll for another time would be “Would Nirvana be considered the Top Grunge Band if Kurt Cobain Never blew his brains out??????”   Think about it. Anyways, it would have been nice to see a dangerous performance lastnight at the American Music Awards, but I was let down again of yet another year of lackluster hip-hop lip sync acts. I’m wearing my worn down flannel shirt right now…peace out….

This past week, rumors surfaced that Aerosmith frontman Steven Tyler was leaving the band to pursue his own personal brand. The ageless rocker, troubled with drug addiction and alcoholism back in 70s and 80s primarily (also recently this past year), has called it quits, for now. “I don’t know what I’m doing yet, but it’s definitely going to be something Steven Tyler: working on the brand of myself — Brand Tyler,” he told Classic Rock magazine recently.
Joe Perry, superstar guitar player for the band, spoke to the Las Vegas Sun saying “Steven quit as far as I can tell. I don’t know anymore than you do about it. I got off the plane two nights ago. I saw online that Steven said that he was going to leave the band. I don’t know for how long, indefinitely or whatever. Other than that, I don’t know.” Perry went on to say that the band plans on moving on, with or without Tyler, and will look for a new lead singer. I’m going to sound very hypocritical here because I have been in full support of bands moving on without a key ingredient to their mix (ie. Slash leaving Guns N’ Roses) but I just find this completely absurd. First of all, replacing a singer isn’t easy. Most average music listeners identify a band with the voice first. Is it impossible to replace a vocalist? Absolutely not. Van Halen replaced David Lee Roth with Sammy Hagar and went on to become ever bigger. AC/DC did it after Bon Scott passed away and continued to rock out kick ass albums after albums. But if Perry is serious about replacing Tyler’s voice with some new character, he will fail. Aerosmith is way past their prime. It happens to every band. I’m not trying to be a hater, believe me. Aerosmith is a Boston band. I’m a Bostonian. Of course I love Aerosmith and have pride in them just like I do for the Sox or Pats, but this just isn’t right, mainly because of their age. Aerosmith’s last successful album arguably was 20 years ago, “Pump”. They then went on to create some hits off of the records “Get a Grip”, “Nine Lives”, and also their most notable and first ever number 1 single of the late 90s “I Don’t Wanna Miss A Thing”, but any fan could tell you that their earlier work was far more potent.
Joe Perry should take a step back and look at that body of work and realize that maybe putting Aerosmith to rest isn’t such a bad idea. I mean, they are in their 60s, have made multimillions, and haven’t quite tarnished the Aerosmith name, although many can argue that they are just a pop mainstream act post-1993. He is walking in seriously dangerous territory if he is really contemplating moving on and replacing Tyler. It will not work out. Let it go, man. Enjoy what you’ve accomplished. Keep your options open for Aerosmith only if Steven is on board and ready to get back on the saddle. If not, you’re talented and an icon yourself. Shuttle your work away from Aerosmith and keep creating. Don’t allow the critics to laugh at this legendary band you’ve helped build. It will happen and I, for one, don’t want to see it occur. Long live Aerosmith.

aerosmith_tyler_perry

Arguably the top band ever to come from the North Country. Gord Downie’s haunting lyrics along with his echoing voice have made the Hip a staple in any true Canadians list of bands. To see the Hip play live anywhere 100 miles away from the Canadian border is a spectacle for any fan. When I saw them in Boston at the House of Blues this past spring, I was standing litterally 10 feet away from the legend known as Gord Downie as he whaled out a setlist of 25+ songs. The new album, We Are The Same, released in 2009, has many hidden gems that will just add to the continuing success of these indie-Canadian rockers. This happens to be my favorite of many off the album…and go figures, they opened with it that night and I was stuck in a cab trying to give the goddamn cabbie directions to the venue. Luckily, I also have the bootleg from the show. Enjoy the Studio version for now. I’m shutting it down for the night. I’m Beat. Keep on rocking and smoke em if you got em.

Who are youuuuuuuu
Who are yooooooooouuuuuu
Who are youuuuuuuuuuuuu

GENIUS!

 

Ok, so I guess third time is a charm? This will be the third time Guns will be touring in support of Chinese Democracy and the first time they have toured since they have released Chinese Democracy. Axl was last performing in early 2007 but then fell off the face of the earth again. I wonder if he will be sporting the braids. I hope he brings back the bandana and maybe Slash?!?! Let’s hope after these dates across the pond and up in Canada, Guns comes home to the States to kick ass.

Dec. 11 – Taipei
Dec. 13 – Seoul
Dec. 16 – Osaka
Dec. 19 – Tokyo
Jan. 13 – Winnipeg, MB – MTS Centre
Jan. 16 – Calgary, AB – Pengrowth Saddledome
Jan. 17 – Edmonton, AB – Rexall Place
Jan. 19 – Saskatoon, SK – Credit Union Centre
Jan. 20 – Regina, SK – Brandt Centre
Jan. 24 – Hamilton, ON – Copps Coliseum
Jan. 25 – London, ON – John Labatt Centre
Jan. 27 – Montreal, PQ – Bell Centre
Jan. 28 – Toronto, ON – Air Canada Centre
Jan. 31 – Ottawa, ON – Scotiabank Place
Feb. 01 – Quebec City, PQ – Colisee Pepsi
Feb. 03 – Moncton, NB – Moncton Coliseum
Feb. 04 – Halifax, NS – Metro Centre